New Survey Reveals Myelodysplastic Syndromes Leave Patients Feeling Fatigued

These rare cancers negatively impact daily lives, but research offers hope.

While understanding the impact of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) on the lives of people diagnosed with these blood cancers can help inform their care, assessments of quality of life in MDS have been, for the most part, lacking.

But a recent survey commissioned by the MDS Foundation, Inc. is helping to fill that gap, to shed some much-needed light on the experience of patients and their caregivers. According to the results, many people with MDS surveyed said that fatigue had a significant impact on their daily lives.

“The number one complaint that we hear, by far, from patients with MDS is that they don’t have the energy to do the things that make them feel like they’re living,” said Tracey Iraca, executive director of the MDS Foundation, which is raising awareness of quality-of-life issues during this year’s MDS World Awareness Day. “There are so many little things we take for granted that these people struggle with.”

A Closer Look at the MDS Symptom of Fatigue

Tracey Iraca

TRACEY IRACA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE MDS FOUNDATION, INC., BELIEVES A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF HOW MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES AFFECT PATIENT LIVES IS THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS IMPROVING THE MANAGEMENT OF THE DISEASE.

The fatigue and tiredness that people with MDS experience interferes with their daily activities, according to the survey. Patients surveyed reported that they often struggled with tasks such as cooking, cleaning, shopping, climbing stairs and taking care of their pets. Several respondents said that they relied on other people to complete many of those chores.

“My house is not nearly as clean since [I was diagnosed with] MDS,” one person responded. “I am exhausted a lot of the time. I can only work short times, and I have to sit down—then I usually fall asleep.”

Some people reported feeling tired all day, every day, while others only experienced exhaustion in the afternoon. Some also said that naps in the afternoon had become a necessity in their everyday life.

Fatigue drains people with MDS not only physically but emotionally, according to the survey. People with MDS reported losing patience with themselves and worrying about their loss of independence. Several also said they experienced feelings of isolation and loneliness from not being able to visit their family and friends.

Why Fatigue Is a Symptom of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

It didn’t surprise Iraca that fatigue was of significant concern for people with MDS. She has heard it dozens of times over the past decade at the Foundation. And she understands why.

In MDS, the bone marrow doesn’t produce enough healthy red blood cells, which transport oxygen to different cells and tissues. Young red blood cells are then inhibited from properly maturing, caused by what is known as erythroid maturation defects.

“The normal development of all blood cells is a complex process that relies on both stem cells and the environment within the bone marrow,” explained Sandra Kurtin, board member of the MDS Foundation, assistant professor of clinical medicine and assistant professor of nursing, The University of Arizona Cancer Center. “This process goes awry in MDS due to a variety of issues.”

As a result of this ineffective development of red blood cells, up to 90 percent of people with MDS have low red blood cell counts, a condition known as anemia. Without enough healthy red blood cells to transport oxygen, it leaves people feeling continuously tired and weak throughout the day.

“Patients are becoming much more aware of what’s happening—they are learning to talk with their doctor about their fatigue and other symptoms of anemia.”

Managing MDS Linked Anemia

Understanding how MDS affects the daily lives of people is the first step toward improving care for the thousands living with this disease. When people with MDS, doctors and caregivers discuss the complete patient experience, they can address what matters most.

“Patients are becoming much more aware of what’s happening—they are learning to talk with their doctor about their fatigue and other symptoms of anemia,” Iraca noted. “We want to educate people to identify these symptoms earlier on so that they can get treatment sooner for anemia.”

People with MDS may receive red transfusions to raise their low blood counts and antibiotics to prevent or fight infections. Some people may also receive a bone marrow transplant, chemotherapy, or other treatment options. Iraca is hopeful that research will help us learn more about the disease and how to treat it.

“Researchers are working to identify genetic defects in MDS so that they can develop therapies to target them,” Iraca said. “The research that’s happening now makes us hopeful.”

To learn about the high unmet need for people with MDS, read “Why I Advocate for People with Myelodysplastic Syndromes.”