How Eosinophilic Esophagitis Affects Our Lives

Despite the difficulties, the List family is not letting this rare disease define them.

In August 2005, Amelia List celebrated her first birthday, and her mother Julie breathed a sigh of relief. She had feared Amelia would develop severe food allergies, as her five-year-old sister Autumn had, by the time she turned one. But it was so far, so good.

Unfortunately, everything went downhill from there, Julie recalls. A month later, the entire family got the stomach flu. Everyone recovered well except for Amelia, whose vomiting and diarrhea continued. Six weeks later, she had lost 20 percent of her body weight. Julie and her husband took their daughter to a gastroenterologist, who diagnosed Amelia with eosinophilic esophagitis.

Having already joined several food allergy forums online, Julie knew what that meant. Eosinophilic esophagitis was not your typical allergic reaction to food. She turned to her husband. “We’re going to be one of those people whose kid can only eat one or two foods,” she told him.

More than 150,000 children and adults in the United States live with eosinophilic esophagitis, a relatively new disease that was only first recognized in the 1990s. There are currently no FDA-approved pharmaceuticals to treat EoE. Symptoms may be managed with elimination diets and other methods. Julie is sharing their story to raise awareness of the disease, with the hope that more can be done to improve their daily struggle.

Identifying Triggers

Julie knew eosinophilic esophagitis was not a typical food allergy, but she was stunned when their local gastroenterologist told them that he could only diagnose but not treat the condition. In fact, at that time, there was no doctor near their home in South Carolina who treated this rare disease. For the next four years, the family traveled eight hours to Cincinnati to see a specialist whenever necessary.

The doctor explained that proteins in the foods Amelia was eating were triggering a type of white blood cell called eosinophils to inflame her esophagus. This inflammation led to her vomiting, difficulty swallowing and recurring stomach pain.

Amelia underwent food trials to identify her food triggers, eating one or more foods at a time for two months to see whether they made her sick. If they didn’t, she’d get an endoscopy to check her upper digestive tract for inflammation. Her doctor would put her under anesthesia and insert a flexible tube with a camera into Amelia’s upper digestive tract.

Her doctor also took six to ten biopsies throughout the esophagus to determine if eosinophils were present. “The biopsies can reveal if eosinophils are present and causing damage that is not visible to the eye,” Julie said. “We never knew if food was safe until the biopsy results were returned.”

She went through this process with a dozen foods. To get her required nutrition, Amelia was given an amino-acid based formula through a gastric feeding tube. “The formula had no proteins that would trigger allergies, but it tasted terrible,” Julie said.

We never tell them they can’t do anything.
We’ve tube-fed Amelia while hiking.

Overcoming Setbacks

In 2007, the List family received more devastating news when their middle child, Abby, was diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis at the age of six. Studies have shown that siblings of someone with eosinophilic esophagitis are at increased risk for the disease, suggesting a role for genetic factors. Environmental factors are also thought to have a role.

Then in 2016, Amelia had a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction to white rice, her first allergic reaction unrelated to her eosinophilic esophagitis. Her immune system reacted, and Amelia soon found she could no longer eat any of the foods she previously tolerated.

Amelia resumed consuming formula through the gastric tube but then started reacting to that, too. To help tolerate the formula, she takes medication twice a day. She once again began food-testing with endoscopies to validate new safe foods. Since her initial diagnosis, Amelia has had 32 endoscopies and counting.

Today, she continues to consume formula, but it is not her sole source of nutrition. She can eat seven foods: apples, sweet potatoes, kidney beans, soy, millet flour, turkey and black olives. “For sure, you get sick of them, but I just have to keep eating them,” Amelia said. “I really don’t have any other choice.”

Growing Up Quickly

Amelia has been administering her own tube-feedings since she was a kid. Now 14, she has it down to a science. She eats this way three times a day, and she takes her equipment with her everywhere, plus the formula and water to mix.

Amelia reminds herself not to let eosinophilic esophagitis hold her back from living the life she’s dreamed of living. “It’s part of you, but it doesn’t control you. It’s not who you are,” Amelia said.

Going out—whether to school, on a field trip, to a friend’s house or on vacation—requires planning. If she goes to a party or sleepover, she brings a can of olives or a sweet potato in case she gets hungry. Sometimes, of course, she chooses to forgo events if she decides that they’re not worth the effort.

“We never tell them they can’t do anything,” Julie said. “We’ve tube-fed Amelia while hiking. But they definitely analyze situations ahead of time, which most kids don’t have to think about. These kids are very responsible and have to grow up quickly.”

To learn more about how Celgene is committed to supporting research for rare diseases, read Supporting Research to Find Cures for Rare Diseases.