We Can’t Afford Not To Innovate and Provide Access to the Best Multiple Myeloma Care Possible

Innovation continues to provide tremendous value to patients and society.

The cost and value of medical innovation in oncology is one of the hot topics on the agenda for this year’s American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting (ASCO). One cancer that has seen an increase in relative survival rates over the past decade is multiple myeloma. So it makes sense that multiple myeloma is at the center of a debate at ASCO on the cost and value of new therapies.

As one of the participants in that debate, Dr. Rafael Fonseca, a hematologist, oncologist and chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will argue that society can’t afford not to provide patients with multiple myeloma access to the best care possible. In this Q&A, Fonseca shares his views about the affordability of cancer therapies, why many doctors hold onto the notion that medications are too expensive and the implications for future multiple myeloma treatment.

DR. RAFAEL FONSECA FROM THE MAYO CLINIC IN ARIZONA BELIEVES THAT SOCIETY CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO PROVIDE PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE MYELOMA ACCESS TO THE BEST CARE POSSIBLE.

DR. RAFAEL FONSECA FROM THE MAYO CLINIC IN ARIZONA BELIEVES THAT SOCIETY CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO PROVIDE PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE MYELOMA ACCESS TO THE BEST CARE POSSIBLE.

In the debate, you will argue that we can’t afford not to provide patients with access to the right treatment for them. How did you come to that conclusion?

“Over the past decade, I’ve witnessed so many patients with multiple myeloma increasingly beating the odds for survival. So I wanted to know what exactly was responsible for this. After some research, I concluded—as many of my colleagues have also—that it was the new medications. These innovative therapies provide tremendous value to our patients and society.”

When you discuss this topic with your fellow oncologists, what is the most compelling evidence supporting your position?

“I usually take a stepped approach to presenting my point of view. I ask them to consider the progress that we’ve made in survival in cancers like multiple myeloma and what they have seen in their own patients. I help them understand the value by walking them through all the new therapies that those improvements are attributed to. You can’t just look at the price tag of a specific medication, which they often focus on most.”

The opposing position is that patients and society cannot afford multiple myeloma therapies. Why don’t you believe that argument?

“The data don’t support the argument. One study found that 98 percent of patients paid $50 or less to fill their prescriptions in 2017. While that could be a hardship for some people, it is far different than the list prices of thousands of dollars that make headlines. So we need to talk about what patients are paying in the real world and what’s best for our patients.”

“Beyond that, there are the ethical considerations. Doctors should prescribe the medications they believe will benefit their patients the most.”

Why do doctors continue to say that new cancer therapies are unaffordable if the data suggest they aren’t for most patients?

“I feel like most cancer doctors are concerned about the cost of prescription medications out of their sense of compassion and responsibility for their patients. They see their role as treating patients responsibly. Prescribing a therapy that may cost them thousands seems inconsistent with that mission.”

“But they are so busy caring for patients that they don’t have the time to research the real world data about what patients actually pay for their prescriptions. As we see in other areas of discourse, facts matter. I believe that misunderstood empathy and baseless rhetoric can have real-world consequences for patients.”

Everyone agrees that today’s cancer treatments are simply not good enough and that innovation is key to improving cancer care.

Have you ever had a patient —or many—who could not access treatments that you prescribed?

“I cannot think of a single patient who could not access a medication due to financial reasons. I’ve had patients who have chosen other treatment options but for other reasons—never financial. In a few instances, we have had to go above and beyond to get them financial help from the manufacturer or non-profit groups. But those cases are the exceptions, not the rule.”

What do those on the other side suggest should be done about the affordability of multiple myeloma care and what are the potential consequences?

“When we say that new therapies are too expensive, what we’re doing is calling for price regulations. But without a doubt in my mind, those regulations will kill innovation. Medical innovation is a high-risk, high-reward endeavor. We should not fool ourselves into thinking that there won’t be consequences; we’ll have fewer new treatments for our patients as a result.”

Is there common ground in this debate over the value of multiple myeloma care that can be used to move forward?

“There is plenty of common ground. I think today’s cancer treatments are simply not good enough and that innovation is key to improving cancer care. So we should make sure that we do not hinder that innovation.”

“Most cancer doctors also agree that clinical trials should be as fast as possible without sacrificing safety, so they cost less and lead to faster approvals. And I think that we all think patients should have access to the best treatment options but have different ideas on how to provide that access.”

To learn more about the how medical innovation has improved the treatment of multiple myeloma, read “A Decade of Progress in Multiple Myeloma, and More to Come.”

Dr. Fonseca has received speaker fees, advisory board fees, travel support in connection with consulting services, and research support from Celgene.