Interest Grows in Targeted IBD Research

Targeted therapies could be an important therapeutic option for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Many people living with moderately to severely active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are looking for additional treatment options to help them to cope with the physical and emotional burdens of their disease. Therapies called biologics that target a protein relevant to the immune system called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are effective for many IBD patients. However, not everyone responds to these treatments. Now, investigational therapies that target other immune pathways are showing promise in clinical trials.

Dr. Brian G. Feagan, director of clinical trials at the Robarts Research Institute, SAYS the Inflammatory bowel disease medical community is increasingly interested in therapies that target sites of inflammation.

Dr. Brian G. Feagan, director of clinical trials at the Robarts Research Institute, SAYS the Inflammatory bowel disease medical community is increasingly interested in therapies that target sites of inflammation.

As more data on these IBD therapies come out of this year’s World Congress of Gastroenterology at ACG2017, Dr. Brian G. Feagan, director of clinical trials at the Robarts Research Institute, explains why the medical community is increasingly interested in therapies that target pathways associated with inflammation in the two most common forms of IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Why is it important to develop targeted therapies for patients with IBD?

“Before biologic therapies were approved for IBD, we relied on steroids and immunosuppressive agents that broadly suppressed the immune system. We didn’t know exactly how these treatments worked but did know that they hit many different pathways. They were not very selective. For some patients whose ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease is caused by a particular pathway, these broad-spectrum agents may or may not hit that pathway, leaving some IBD patients without an effective treatment.”

People feel like they cannot plan their lives with the disease, but the continued investment in research is giving them hope.

How did the biologics change IBD treatment for patients?

“The biologics target a single protein that plays a role in the development of IBD, called TNF. Before the success of these anti-TNF therapies, the medical community didn’t think that blocking a single molecule or pathway would be effective. They believed that a combination of pathways was responsible for disease and that broad-spectrum therapy was needed. Clinical trials proved that theory wrong, at least for some patients. We have learned a lot about TNF blockers in the last 20  years.”

To learn why researchers must continue to explore new treatment options for IBD, read the “World IBD Day: Current Treatments for IBD Not Meeting Patient Needs” infographic.

To learn why researchers must continue to explore new treatment options for IBD, read the “World IBD Day: Current Treatments for IBD Not Meeting Patient Needs” infographic.


How have advances in understanding IBD opened the door for additional targeted therapies?

“Now that we know a single pathway can make a difference, as with TNF, researchers have started to look for other specific pathways associated with IBD. We are learning more about how these pathways control the immune response, interact with bacteria in our gut and are associated with complications of the disease, such as blockages in the intestine (strictures) and inflammatory tracts between the bowel and other organs, most commonly the skin (fistulas). This focus on specific pathways has evolved out of oncology, where researchers look for disease-related pathways and then use therapies that target specific pathways in individual patients. We haven’t quite gotten there in IBD, but that is the goal.”

Why is new research important for patients?

“People with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease deal with substantial mental and social disabilities. The embarrassment of having IBD can negatively affect their lives. People feel like they cannot plan their lives with the disease, but the continued investment in research is giving them hope.”

To learn why researchers must continue to explore new treatment options for IBD, read the “World IBD Day: Current Treatments for IBD Not Meeting Patient Needs” infographic.