Supporting Nurses Who Care for Multiple Myeloma Patients

New resource provides valuable information about this rare cancer for nurses and their patients.

Multiple Myeloma Center for Nurses

By educating patients, oncology nurses play a critical role in improving the lives of those living with cancer. But for rare forms of cancer such as multiple myeloma, nurses in small community oncology centers might see only a few cases per year, meaning their experience and understanding of the disease may be limited.

“We heard from many academic nurses who exclusively care for patients with multiple myeloma that they are flooded with questions about the disease from the nursing community,” Michele Renz, multiple myeloma marketing manager at Celgene, said. “There is a knowledge gap within the oncology nursing community that we thought we could fill in an innovative way.”

With the guidance of some of the country’s leading oncology nursing experts, Celgene has now launched the Multiple Myeloma Center for Nurses, a new website to provide nurses with essential information about this rare blood disease.

Nurses have always played an important role in patient care, especially in oncology, and that role is expanding now because of factors such as physician availability

Over the past decade, new therapies have been transforming multiple myeloma from a deadly disease to a chronic condition that can be managed over years. Although multiple myeloma represents only 1.4 percent of all cancer cases, oncology nurses also need to know about the proper use and potential side effects of these new treatments, so they can help patients stay on their medications to maximize their benefits.

The Multiple Myeloma Center for Nurses was designed to help nurses stay on top of the ever-evolving treatment landscape, by allowing them to quickly familiarize themselves with the disease and treatment options through answers to common questions.

“Nurses have always played an important role in patient care, especially in oncology, and that role is expanding now because of factors such as physician availability,” said Renz. “They get asked the most questions from patients, so it’s essential that they have the latest and most accurate information about the disease.”

To ensure the content on the site is medically accurate, experts from academic centers that specialize in the treatment of multiple myeloma reviews all content before its publication. Those who register on the site can request a visit from a Celgene clinical nurse consultant (CNC) and receive important research updates.

“Everybody learns differently, so we’re presenting the information in a number of ways,” said Renz. “Visitors will be able to listen to a lecture from one of the expert nurses, read articles or download materials to share with patients.”

Every day, researchers are continuing to improve our understanding of this disease and how to care for patients better; the Multiple Myeloma Center for Nurses will help nurses keep up with these advances to improve the lives of their patients.