Painting a Clearer Picture of Psoriasis Comorbidities

Comorbidities can affect the health and care of people living with plaque psoriasis.

The public often only sees the outside symptoms of plaque psoriasis: raised, red patches of skin covered with silvery scales. But the “Psoriasis Inside Out” theme of this year’s World Psoriasis Day (October 29) implores us to look at the “less visible” aspects of the disease.

New research is shining a light on one of those hidden characteristics of psoriasis: the increased risk of developing other diseases. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis include psoriatic arthritis, depression, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease.

Dr. Steven Feldman, a dermatologist practicing at Wake Forest University, explains that the presence of psoriasis comorbidities can affect a patient's health and their care.

Dr. Steven Feldman, a dermatologist practicing at Wake Forest University, explains that the presence of psoriasis comorbidities can affect a patient’s health and their care.

The presence of these comorbidities can not only impact a patient’s health but also affect their care. “For example, if a patient has a comorbidity of diabetes or liver disease, certain medicines may not be the most appropriate choice of treatment because they could increase the risk of liver damage,” explained Dr. Steven Feldman, a dermatologist practicing at Wake Forest University.

Although physicians who treat patients with psoriasis may be aware of comorbidities, dermatologists often focus on the skin, and other specialists may not pay attention to psoriasis as they focus on the particular disease or condition that they have expertise in. As a result, the medical community has struggled to understand the full extent of comorbidities in psoriasis patients.

To paint a clearer picture, Dr. Feldman and his colleagues analyzed insurance claims data from over 460,000 Americans diagnosed with psoriasis from 2008 to 2014. They found that 46 percent of those psoriasis patients were also diagnosed with high cholesterol, 42 percent with high blood pressure and 18 percent with depression. Other common comorbidities in this psoriasis population included diabetes, obesity and heart disease.

“While this approach is good, it’s not perfect,” Dr. Feldman explained. “For instance, if people don’t go to the doctor, then their psoriasis or their comorbidities would not be detected in studies.”

People with psoriasis should have regular health exams and screening tests to monitor their weight, blood pressure and cholesterol.

While the study provides a clearer picture of the burden of comorbidities, the relationship between psoriasis and these coexisting diseases remains less clear. So far, researchers have identified some potential contributing factors including common inflammatory pathways, cellular mediators and genetic susceptibility.

“Also, people living with psoriasis can make lifestyle choices that could reduce their risk of comorbidities,” Dr. Feldman said. “For instance, exercise and a healthy diet may help to prevent cardiovascular disease for people with psoriasis.”

The Most Prevalent Comorbidities in Psoriasis Patients

REFERENCE: SHAH KAMAL, MILLAR’S LILLIAN, CHANGOLKAR ARUN, FELDMAN STEVEN R.. REAL-WORLD BURDEN OF COMORBIDITIES IN US PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY. 2017;77.

While dermatologists commonly screen for comorbidities such as psoriatic arthritis and depression, screening for other comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease is often done by the patients’ primary care providers.  Even though we do not understand the underlying factors that link these diseases, the fact remains that it’s important for patients and physicians to be aware of these comorbidities. Increasing awareness can help these psoriatic disease comorbidities and their risk factors from being overlooked and could potentially lead to earlier diagnosis and management.

“We don’t have enough research to know fully how comorbidities should affect our treatment,” Dr. Feldman said. “But given the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, people with psoriasis should have regular health exams and screening tests to track their weight, blood pressure and cholesterol.”

To learn why it’s important for psoriasis patients to obtain access to their recommended medications immediately, read “Psoriasis Patients Deserve Their Prescribed Therapy Without Delay.”