Fueling New Jersey’s Innovation Economy

Young biopharmaceutical researchers and companies enabled to spur discovery and development of transformational medicines at Celgene’s new incubator.

New Jersey is well-positioned for strong economic growth, and biopharmaceutical innovation is a significant driver of that potential. In 2011, the biopharmaceutical industry supported 322,049 direct and indirect jobs and created $87 billion in economic output in the Garden State. To ensure a high-growth N.J. economy for the future, the biopharmaceutical industry is helping to strengthen the state’s ecosystem of innovation by supporting emerging companies, job growth and pro-innovation policies.

“Historically, New Jersey has been a powerhouse in the biopharmaceutical industry,” said Debbie Hart, president and CEO of BioNJ, a non-profit that promotes the state’s biotechnology industry. “Because of its strong foundation in life sciences, increasing early-stage medical innovation is one of the greatest growth opportunities in New Jersey.”

One reason for New Jersey’s historical and continued leadership in the global biopharma industry is its highly skilled and educated workforce. The state has skilled biopharmaceutical talent and more scientists and engineers per square mile than anywhere else in the world. This workforce is supported by the five research universities,13 teaching hospitals and four medical schools that call New Jersey home.

Location also makes New Jersey attractive to biotech companies, given its proximity to important collaborators, which include the many established pharmaceutical companies within the state, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health a train ride away in Maryland, and Wall Street and venture capital across the river in New York.

Startups are particularly important in driving medical innovation in New Jersey’s biopharmaceutical industry. The majority of treatments approved in recent years originated in companies outside of the 30 largest biopharmaceutical firms; 2016 followed that trend, with more than 60 percent of approved therapies coming from companies with a significant New Jersey footprint.

Incubators serve an important role in helping startups establish themselves and grow, providing resources that would otherwise be unavailable

While New Jersey has the right ingredients to attract biopharmaceutical startups, its entrepreneurial ecosystem has the opportunity to offer even better support to home-grown startups, through incubators and business accelerators that offer resources such as funding, mentoring, workspace or equipment to young companies. Currently, New Jersey has 15 business incubators and accelerator programs compared with 375 for California and 179 for New York.

DEBBIE HART, CEO AND PRESIDENT OF BIONJ, BELIEVES NEW JERSEY’S BIOPHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY HAS THE POTENTIAL TO DRIVE THE STATE’S ECONOMIC GROWTH.

DEBBIE HART, CEO AND PRESIDENT OF BIONJ, BELIEVES NEW JERSEY’S BIOPHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY HAS THE POTENTIAL TO DRIVE THE STATE’S ECONOMIC GROWTH.

“Incubators serve an important role in helping startups establish themselves and grow, providing resources that would otherwise be unavailable to such young companies,” Hart said. “Looking at the biopharma industry in New Jersey, more incubators can certainly help increase early-stage innovation.”

Recognizing this opportunity, Celgene has launched the Thomas O. Daniel Research and Collaboration Center on its campus in Summit, New Jersey. The new center will provide state-of-the-art facilities and resources for high-potential scientists to build on their preclinical research in the important effort to discover innovative therapies for patients with unmet medical needs.

“With its iconic brand and cutting-edge science, the Thomas O. Daniel Research Incubator and Collaboration Center has the potential to attract, create and support companies that will produce the world’s next generation of therapies and cures,” Hart said. “Those treatments will help cut the overall cost of health care, which will benefit the economy, society and—most importantly—our patients.”

Prospective researchers, entrepreneurs and companies interested in joining the Incubator will submit applications for residency on the webpage within the Collaboration Center, which will be reviewed by a Celgene selection committee.

“The HealthCare Institute of New Jersey (HINJ) congratulates Celgene on the launch of its incubator, which will enhance New Jersey’s expanding innovation ecosystem,” said Dean J. Paranicas, President and Chief Executive Officer of HINJ.  “We look for this exciting initiative to create opportunities for new life sciences companies to develop novel treatments and cures that will benefit patients everywhere.”

To learn more about  the Thomas O. Daniel Research Incubator and Collaboration Center  and find out how you can apply, visit CelgeneIncubator.com.